Nonspecific vulvar ulcers

Bohl TG. Vulvar Ulcers and Erosions: A Clinical Approach. Clin Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Sep;58(3):492-502.

Vulvar ulcers have a plethora of potential causes and variable clinical presentations that can prove to be a challenge to any clinician. The terminology of these causes can further add to the difficulty of diagnosis. A clinical approach to diagnosis and management is presented with classification tables and a discussion of the terminology of aphthosis, a common cause of vulvar ulceration.

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Sehgal VN, et al. Nonspecific genital ulcers. Clin Dermatol. 2014 Mar-Apr;32(2):259-74.

Recent intervention of nonspecific genital ulcers has added refreshing dimensions to genital ulcer disease. It was considered pertinent to dwell on diverse clinical presentation and diagnostic strategies. It seems to possess spectrum. It includes infective causes, Epstein Bar Virus, tuberculosis, Leishmaniasis, HIV/AIDS related ulcers and amoebiasis. Noninfective causes are immunobullous disorders, aphthosis, Behcet’s disease (BD), inflammatory bowel disease, lichen planus and lichen sclerosis et atrophicus, drug reactions, premalignant and malignant conditions, pyoderma gangrenosum, and hidradenitis suppurativa. The diagnostic features and treatment option of each disorder are succinctly outlined for ready reference.

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Rosman IS, et al. Acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active young girls: case series, review of the literature, and evaluation and management recommendations. Pediatr Dermatol. 2012 Mar-Apr;29(2):147-53.

Acute genital ulcers rarely occur in nonsexually active young girls. When present, they can cause significant physical and emotional distress for the patient and her parents, and prompt an evaluation for sexual abuse and sexually transmitted diseases. With this review, we aim to further characterize acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active young girls by reviewing the medical records of patients with this disorder and to offer an approach to the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of acute genital ulcers based on our understanding and knowledge of this condition. We retrospectively review our understanding and knowledge of acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active girls at a pediatric hospital. A review of the recent literature on acute genital ulcers and a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of acute genital ulcers are also presented. Twelve patients presented with acute genital ulcers, 11 of which were hospitalized for evaluation and pain management. Extensive work-up failed to reveal a specific infectious or autoimmune etiology in all but one patient, who was diagnosed with acute mycoplasma pneumonia. Acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active young girls likely represent a form of idiopathic vulvar aphthosis. Evaluation of a first episode of acute genital ulcers with mild prodromal symptoms should be limited. Treatment consists primarily of supportive care and symptom relief.

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Bandow GD. Diagnosis and management of vulvar ulcers. Dermatol Clin. 2010 Oct;28(4):753-63.

The diagnosis and management of the following non-infectious vulvar ulcers are reviewed: vulvar aphthae in adult and pediatric patients, aphthae associated with Behçet’s disease, vulvar ulcers resulting from Crohn’s disease, and vulvar ulcers associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection. There are many resources providing excellent reviews of infectious ulcers; therefore this topic will not be covered here.

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More PubMed results on vulvar ulcers.

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